Are Fayetteville job ads discriminating by age?

September 9th, 2018

Are Fayetteville job ads on social media discriminating by age? That may be the case for some cities, according to Challenge, Gray & Christmas.

The onset of new recruitment technologies and ubiquitous online job boards has led most companies to post at least some of their positions online in order to cast the widest net. However, the recruitment strategy that includes posting job ads to social media may miss a huge swath of some of the most valuable talent – older professionals, according to one workplace authority.

“With the advent and widespread adaption of social media, it is easier than ever for companies to share their opportunities with a wide audience, as well as target those opportunities to specific audiences. Whether on Facebook, LinkedIn, company websites, or online job boards, job postings are commonplace online,” said Andrew Challenger, Vice President of global outplacement and executive coaching firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

Some companies may be using social media to directly target young, entry-level candidates for their positions. A recent lawsuit argues that the ability to target certain age groups for job advertisements on social media is discriminatory, according to an article from the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM).

Though the courts have yet to decide whether posting jobs to social media is discriminatory, Millennials and Gen Z likely have an easier time finding and applying for these jobs posted online than their older counterparts, due to having grown up with the Internet and social media.

“In addition to the potential legal issues, companies that only target younger workers could be missing the perfect people for not only their open positions, but also for their specific cultures and environments. The experience and institutional knowledge older job seekers bring to a position – at any level – are extremely valuable,” said Challenger.

Regardless of whether companies are targeting specific age groups, more companies are advertising positions on social media. According to a 2015 SHRM survey, 89 percent of companies post their job advertisements on social media. Meanwhile, according to a 2017 Challenger survey among 300 recruiters, nearly 80 percent of companies vet candidates through their social media profiles. Another 43 percent reported that having no social media presence hurts a candidate.

 

 

IT jobs in Fayetteville grow

September 3rd, 2018

A number of IT jobs in Fayetteville are growing, according to recent labor statistics.

According to CareerBuilder’s Midyear Job Forecast, 63 percent of U.S. employers plan to hire full-time, permanent workers in the second half of 2018, up from 60 percent last year.

A substantial percentage of employers hiring in the second half of 2018 are expecting to offer higher salaries and various perks — such as signing bonuses, extra paid time off, free lunches and the ability to work remotely — to attract and keep the talent they need.

Employers expect to provide a greater financial incentive to new workers and existing staff. Forty-five percent plan to increase starting salaries on new job offers in the back half of 2018; 23 percent of all employers plan to increase starting salaries by 5 percent or more. Fifty-eight percent of employers will increase compensation for current employees before year end, with 24 percent of all employers planning an increase of 5 percent or more on average.

The study shows that compensation increases aren’t limited to high-skill positions. Looking at a subset of human resource managers, 71 percent believe they have to pay entry-level workers more money because of tight talent pools.

From a functional standpoint, the top roles employers hiring in the second half of 2018 say they will be hiring include:

  1. Customer service – 41 percent
  2. Sales – 28 percent
  3. Information technology – 22 percent
  4. Product development – 16 percent
  5. Business development – 16 percent

Sixty-nine percent of employers said every job is essentially a tech job because every job has some technical component to it today. That sentiment is reflected in how employers recruit and interview for different roles.

 

Social media and Fayetteville jobs

August 27th, 2018

Those who post on social media while looking for Fayetteville jobs may need to be more careful, according to a recent Careerbuilder survey.

Seventy percent of employers use social networking sites to research job candidates (on par with last year), while seven percent plan to start. And that review matters: Of those that do social research, 57 percent have found content that caused them not to hire candidates.

Broken down by industry, those in IT* (74 percent) and manufacturing (73 percent) are more likely than those in retail/non-retail sales* (59 percent) to do social networking digging on potential job candidates. But it’s not just the social sites that are fair game – 66 percent of employers say they use search engines to conduct their research on potential job candidates.

Nearly half of employers (47 percent) say that if they can’t find a job candidate online, they are less likely to call that person in for an interview – 28 percent say that is because they like to gather more information before calling in a candidate for an interview; 20 percent say they expect candidates to have an online presence.

According to employers who use social networking sites to research potential job candidates, what they’re looking for when researching candidates is:

  • Information that supports their qualifications for the job: 58 percent
  • If the candidate has a professional online persona: 50 percent
  • What other people are posting about the candidate: 34 percent
  • A reason not to hire the candidate: 22 percent

Content to be Careful About
As social media permeates all aspects of our personal and professional lives, what you post online can have serious and lasting consequences. Employers who found content on a social networking site that caused them not to hire a job candidate said these were the primary reasons:

  • Job candidate posted provocative or inappropriate photographs, videos or information: 40 percent
  • Job candidate posted information about them drinking or using drugs: 36 percent
  • Job candidate had discriminatory comments related to race, gender, religion, etc.: 31 percent
  • Job candidate was linked to criminal behavior: 30 percent
  • Job candidate lied about qualifications: 27 percent
  • Job candidate had poor communication skills: 27 percent
  • Job candidate bad-mouthed their previous company or fellow employee: 25 percent
  • Job candidate’s screen name was unprofessional: 22 percent
  • Job candidate shared confidential information from previous employers: 20 percent
  • Job candidate lied about an absence: 16 percent
  • Job candidate posted too frequently: 12 percent

 

Did healthcare jobs in Fayetteville get cut?

August 6th, 2018

A number of healthcare jobs in Fayetteville and other locations may have been cut, according to recent labor statistics from Challenger, Gray & Christmas.

The pace of downsizing fell to the lowest level of the year in July, as U.S.-based employers announced plans to cut 27,122 workers from payrolls during the month, according to a report by global outplacement and executive coaching firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

July’s total fell 27.1 percent from the 37,202 cuts announced in June and 4.2 percent from the same time last year, when 28,307 cuts were announced. Last month’s total was the lowest of the year, falling below the previous low of 31,517 recorded in May.

July’s cuts were the lowest since November 2016, when employers announced 26,936 cuts.

“The economy is at near-full employment. Nearly 90 percent of companies recently polled by Challenger are either actively hiring or in retention mode. Companies are not letting go of their workforces right now,” said John Challenger, Chief Executive Officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. So far this year, employers have announced 272,301 cuts, 6.7 percent higher than the 255,307 announced through this point last year.

“Retail cuts have been inching up the last four years, as online shopping causes disruptions to business as usual. We’re starting to see layoffs in this sector that rival recession years,” said Challenger. Health Care companies follow in cuts with 28,484, up 32 percent from the 21,554 cuts announced in this sector in the first seven months of last year. “Health Care providers are undergoing cost-cutting measures and targeting labor costs, all while dealing with skills shortages. Hospitals especially face challenges in balancing cost-saving measures with quality-of-care issues,” said Challenger.

Salaries for plumbing jobs in Fayetteville

July 25th, 2018

A new survey from Careerbuilder takes a look at plumbing jobs in Fayetteville among other jobs that pay more than $20/hr and don’t require a college degree.

CareerBuilder published a new hot list of ten jobs that:

  • pay ~$20 or more per hour
  • have grown over the last five years
  • are projected to grow over the next five years
  • don’t require a college degree

 

Occupation

Growth in

Jobs

2013-2017

Total No.
of Jobs in
2018

Total No.
of Jobs in

2022

Growth in
Jobs

2018-2022

Average
Hourly
Earnings

Required

Education

Electricians

68,668

11%

705,858

743,451

37,592

5%

$26.33

High School Diploma &

Apprenticeship

Plumbers, Pipefitters and Steamfitters

63,161

15%

498,239

525,038

26,799

5%

$25.76

High School Diploma & Apprenticeship

Computer User Support Specialists

63,822

10%

713,398

761,801

48,402

7%

$25.50

Some College

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

28,601

9%

361,122

390,328

29,206

8%

$24.87

High School Diploma &

On-the-Job Training

Surgical Technologists

8,691

9%

112,614

120,104

7,490

7%

$22.68

Postsecondary Non-degree Award

Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers

49,487

17%

354,366

375,649

21,283

6%

$22.39

Postsecondary Non-degree Award & On-the-Job Training

Chefs and Head Cooks

17,585

13%

159,547

169,488

9,941

6%

$21.54

High School Diploma & On-the-Job Training

Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors

41,224

14%

333,923

354,473

20,550

6%

$20.23

High School Diploma & On-the-Job Training

Medical Records and Health Information Technicians

14,617

7%

216,651

231,394

14,743

7%

$19.96

Postsecondary Non-degree Award

Self-Enrichment Education Teachers

38,145

11%

404,029

436,063

32,034

8%

$19.91

High School Diploma

Are workers gaining weight at Fayetteville jobs?

July 25th, 2018

Some workers admit to gaining some weight at Fayetteville jobs, including other locations, according to a survey from Careerbuilder.

The survey finds that 57 percent of the nation’s workforce believe they are overweight, and 45 percent believe they’ve gained weight at their present job, on par with last year. Twenty-six percent of all workers said they gained more than 10 pounds at their current job; 1 in 10 (11 percent) gained more than 20 pounds.

Many factors can have a positive or negative impact on a worker’s waistline. When surveyed about what they think contributes to weight gain at work, workers who have gained weight said:

  • Sitting at a desk most of the day (53 percent)
  • Too tired from work to exercise (49 percent)
  • Eating because of stress (41 percent)
  • No time to exercise before or after work (34 percent)
  • The temptation of the office candy jar (21 percent)
  • Eating out regularly (21 percent)
  • Workplace celebrations (13 percent)
  • Having to skip meals because of time constraints (12 percent)
  • Happy hours (6 percent)
  • Pressure to eat food co-workers bring in (6 percent)

“Employers understand that healthy employees lead to a more productive workforce and are taking steps to promote healthier lifestyles both in and out of the workplace,” said Michael Erwin, senior career advisor at CareerBuilder. “Ten percent of employees are not sure if their employer offers wellness benefits. Focusing on education of these types of benefits goes a long way to not only improve the overall health of the workforce, but can help with retention of talent.”

 

Salaries and Fayetteville jobs

July 8th, 2018

New research may shed some light on salaries and Fayetteville jobs, among other locations.

To untangle today’s college and career maze, new research from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce (Georgetown Center), Five Rules of the College and Career Game shows that college is less about what college you go to and what degree you get but more about the returns of individual college programs. Since the 1980s, 60 percent to 70 percent of the increase in earnings inequality has been due to differences in access to college programs with labor market value.

As postsecondary education and training has become the most well-traveled pathway to middle class earnings, students, their families, and educators need to learn five rules in the college and career game.

And sometimes those rules are contradictory. Rule 1: More education is usually better. Median earnings increase with each additional level of educational attainment.

The median earnings of a high school diploma holder are $36,000, while a BA holder makes $62,000, and a graduate degree holder earns $80,000, on average. Rule 2: Majors matter more.

A bachelor’s degree in architecture and engineering leads to median annual earnings of $85,000, almost double the median annual earnings of education majors of $46,000.

Rule 3: Majors are important, but they do not control one’s destiny. The top 25 percent of liberal arts majors ($81,000) make more than the bottom 25 percent of architecture and engineering majors ($60,000).

Electrician jobs in Fayetteville earn big bucks

July 8th, 2018

Careerbuilder has released a list of jobs, including electrician jobs in Fayetteville, among other locations, that earn top dollar without a college degree.

The job board published a new hot list of ten jobs that:

  • pay ~$20 or more per hour
  • have grown over the last five years
  • are projected to grow over the next five years
  • don’t require a college degree

 

Occupation

Growth in

Jobs

2013-2017

Total No.
of Jobs in
2018

Total No.
of Jobs in

2022

Growth in
Jobs

2018-2022

Average
Hourly
Earnings

Required

Education

Electricians

68,668

11%

705,858

743,451

37,592

5%

$26.33

High School Diploma &

Apprenticeship

Plumbers, Pipefitters and Steamfitters

63,161

15%

498,239

525,038

26,799

5%

$25.76

High School Diploma & Apprenticeship

Computer User Support Specialists

63,822

10%

713,398

761,801

48,402

7%

$25.50

Some College

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

28,601

9%

361,122

390,328

29,206

8%

$24.87

High School Diploma &

On-the-Job Training

Surgical Technologists

8,691

9%

112,614

120,104

7,490

7%

$22.68

Postsecondary Non-degree Award

Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers

49,487

17%

354,366

375,649

21,283

6%

$22.39

Postsecondary Non-degree Award & On-the-Job Training

Chefs and Head Cooks

17,585

13%

159,547

169,488

9,941

6%

$21.54

High School Diploma & On-the-Job Training

Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors

41,224

14%

333,923

354,473

20,550

6%

$20.23

High School Diploma & On-the-Job Training

Medical Records and Health Information Technicians

14,617

7%

216,651

231,394

14,743

7%

$19.96

Postsecondary Non-degree Award

Self-Enrichment Education Teachers

38,145

11%

404,029

436,063

32,034

8%

$19.91

High School Diploma

 

Business development jobs in Fayetteville are popular among employers

June 26th, 2018

According to a recent study from Careerbuilder, business development jobs in Fayetteville, among other career choices, are popular among local and national employers.

Employers say they are planning to hire more recent college graduates this year than they have in more than a decade, according to new CareerBuilder research. Eighty percent of employers say they plan to hire college graduates this year, up from 74 percent last year and 58 percent in 2008. Those who are not hiring college grads say it’s because their organization isn’t expanding headcount this year (57 percent) or they need more experienced workers (26 percent).

While the majority of employers say academic institutions are adequately preparing students for roles needed in their organization (82 percent), that doesn’t necessarily mean graduates have the job-seeking skills needed to land the job. Employers said that over the past year, more than half of recent college graduates:

  • Didn’t send a thank you note: 37 percent
  • Didn’t know anything about the company: 35 percent
  • Didn’t submit a cover letter: 31 percent
  • Didn’t ask any questions in the interview: 29 percent
  • Didn’t have professional references: 26 percent
  • Had poor grammar on their resume: 26 percent
  • Had unprofessional pictures on their social media profiles: 21 percent
  • Checked their mobile phone during the interview: 19 percent

Additionally, employers hiring recent college graduates this year state the following majors are the most in-demand at their firms:

  • Business: 35 percent
  • Engineering: 22 percent
  • Computer and information sciences: 18 percent
  • Engineering technologies: 13 percent
  • Communications technologies: 11 percent
  • Health professions and related clinical sciences: 11 percent
  • Math and statistics: 9 percent
  • Science technologies: 7 percent
  • Mechanic and repair technologies: 6 percent
  • Public administration and social services: 6 percent
  • Construction trades: 6 percent
  • Communication and journalism: 5 percent
  • Education: 5 percent
  • Transportation and materials moving: 5 percent
  • Liberal arts and sciences, general studies and humanities: 5 percent

 

Company commits funds to boost trades jobs in Fayetteville

June 6th, 2018

The Home Depot is committing to giving funds over to boost training and trades jobs in Fayetteville, among other locations.

The Home Depot Foundation announced a $50 million commitment to train 20,000 tradespeople over the next 10 years in order to fill the growing skilled labor gap.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are currently 158,000 unfilled construction sector jobs in the U.S. – a number that is expected to increase significantly as tradespeople retire over the next decade. The ratio of construction job openings to hirings, as measured by the Department of Labor, is at its highest level since 2007.

In 2017, The Home Depot Foundation launched a pilot trades training program for separating military members in partnership with nonprofit Home Builders Institute (HBI) on Ft. Stewart and Ft. Bragg. The first set of students will graduate this March. The 12-week pre-apprenticeship certification program, which is provided at no cost to students, uses an industry-based curriculum recognized by the Department of Labor that integrates work-based learning with technical and academic skills. The program, which has a job placement rate of more than 90 percent, will now roll out on additional bases across the United States.

“We want to bring shop class back, from coast-to-coast,” said Shannon Gerber, executive director of The Home Depot Foundation. “We’re thrilled to train 20,000 next-generation plumbers, electricians, carpenters and beyond. It’s a true honor to welcome our first classes of separating soldiers as they transition to civilian life and into successful careers in the trades.”

“HBI has a 50-year history of training individuals with the skills they need to succeed in the building industry. Our program prepares men and women for high-growth careers in the industry after leaving military service,” said HBI CEO John Courson. “With 200,000 service members separating from the military every year, our partnership with The Home Depot Foundation enables us to serve more veterans across the country.”